Category: WordPress
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ecommerce website
Example online shop you can build following this guide.

In this tutorial, I’ll teach you how to set up a WooCommerce + WordPress online store where you can list and sell physical products.

At the end of this tutorial, your e-commerce site should be something similar to this image at the right:

P.S. If you plan to sell services (instead of products), I recommend starting a business website (not online store). Here’s guide to setting up a business website.

If you plan to sell more than 10 different products, keep reading.

Use WordPress + WooCommerce for online store (FREE)

In a sentence, WooCommerce is the best way to turn your WordPress website into a fully functional e-commerce store. Here are the specifics:

  • Technically speaking, WooCommerce is a WordPress plugin. It needs to be installed and activated just like any other plugins in order to function.
  • It’s free and open source – just like WordPress – you don’t need any licenses, things don’t expire, no one comes asking for money at any point.
  • It’s the most popular e-commerce plugin for WordPress out there.
  • It’s (arguably) the most feature-rich such plugin too.
  • You can set it up and configure it by yourself.
  • The setup is fast. Usually just a matter of an afternoon.
  • It works with any design/theme you currently have on your WordPress site = you don’t need to ditch your current website design.

I could continue with the list above, but instead, let me just say that WooCommerce simply gives you all you could ever need to build a high-quality e-commerce store with WordPress.

What can you sell with WordPress + WooCommerce?

Hmm.. a lot:

  • digital products (e.g. software, downloads, ebooks),
  • physical products,
  • services,
  • bookings (e.g. for appointments, or anything else that can be booked),
  • subscriptions,
  • other people’s products – as an affiliate,
  • customizations (e.g. additional customizations on top of your product listings), and more.

In other words, you can make money with your website.

I would even risk saying that WooCommerce allows you to sell anything that can have a price tag assigned to it. On top of that, anyone can use it (if you’ve already managed to get a WordPress site launched, then you are also going to be able to handle WooCommerce).

How to build an online store with WordPress and WooCommerce

Note. The goal of this part of the guide is to show you the simplest method of building a functional e-commerce store on WordPress, so that you can get your store online as soon as possible. That is why I’m going to focus on just the essential things and skip the more advanced aspects.

STEP 1. Get a domain name and web hosting

In order to create an online store, or any other type of website, you’re going to need to two things:

  • Domain name is your store’s unique address on the web. Something like YOURSTORE.com
  • Web Hosting is basically a remote computer that stores your website and then serves it up to whoever wants to visit it. (more detailed explanation)

There are hundreds of different hosting/domain providers, but I usually get both from Bluehost.com. They offer affordable web hosting, free domain name and reliability. They’re also one of the few recommended (official) hosting providers by WordPress.org.

Total cost? $2.95/mo :). For Bluehost alternatives, check this the top 10 WordPress hosts here.

To begin, you just need to go to Bluehost.com, and click the “get started” button.

web hosting landing page

This will take you to a page where you can select a hosting plan for your store. You can get started with the cheapest option, labeled “basic”:

bluehost select

The next step is all about picking a domain name for your new online store.

bluehost domain

This requires some brainstorming. But in general, you want your domain name to be unique, easy to remember and catchy. Also, if you already have a business entity set up for your store, then you should perhaps go with that as your domain name.

Once you make your domain choice, you can finalize the setup and pay the initial hosting fee.

Great! You’ve just got yourself a domain name and a hosting plan to go along with it.

STEP 2. Install WordPress (FREE)

The next step officially marks the start of your adventure with WordPress – you’re going to install WordPress on your hosting account.

This might sound difficult, but it’s actually not. All you do is go to your Bluehost user panel (Bluehost will send you a link to it in the confirmation email) – usually available at my.bluehost.com.

Once there, scroll down until you see an icon labeled “Install WordPress”:

choose wordpress

Click it and follow the on-screen instructions. You will be taken through the whole process step by step, so there’s nothing to worry about.

If you need more hands-on info on picking a domain and installing a clean copy of WordPress, please go ahead and visit this guide (scroll to steps 2).

At this point, you should have a blank WordPress website installed.

  • You can see it by going to your main domain name (e.g., YOURSTORE.com)
  • You can log in to the admin panel by going to YOURSTORE.com/wp-admin

Now it’s time to turn that blank WordPress website into a fully-functional e-commerce store built with the excellent WooCommerce plugin.

STEP 3. Install WooCommerce Plugin (FREE)

Like with all WordPress plugins, the fun starts by navigating to your WordPress Dashboard / Plugins / Add New. Once there, type “woocommerce” in the search field. You’ll see WooCommerce as the first search result:

woocommerce install

Just click the “Install Now” button next to the plugin.

After a couple of seconds, the text on the button will change to “Activate.” Go ahead and click it.

woocommerce activate

At this stage, you’ll see WooCommerce’s on-screen launch/setup wizard. This thing makes the process uber-easy and takes you by the hand through everything. To begin, click “Let’s Go!”

woocommerce wizard 1

Get the essential store pages created

Online stores are a particular kind of website, and they do need some particular pages to function properly. The first step in the WooCommerce wizard is about creating these pages for you:

  • “Shop” – this is where your products are going to be displayed.
  • “Cart” – this is the shopping cart where your customers can go to adjust their order before proceeding to checkout.
  • “Checkout” – this is where the customers get to pick the shipping/delivery method and pay for whatever they’ve bought.
  • “My Account” – a kind of a profile page for registered customers (they will be able to view their past orders there and manage other details).

All you need to do at this stage of the WooCommerce wizard is click the “Continue” button. WooCommerce will set up those pages for you.

Set up locale

The locale is a truly crucial part of your store setup. Those few parameters define your business origin, currency, and preferred units:

woocommerce wizard 2

Once you’re done, click “Continue” again.

Understand Sales Tax

Tax is by far the least exciting part of running an e-commerce store, but it’s also something we can’t disregard, sadly.

Anyway, you’re going to be pleased to see that WooCommerce helps you with this part too.

First, you can select if you’re going to be shipping physical goods or not. If you check the box, WooCommerce will pre-set the remaining shipping-related details in the settings.

woocommerce wizard shipping

Next, tax. WooCommerce has a very neat tax module, and the best thing about it is that it helps you figure out the tax rates based on your store location (the thing you’ve set in the previous step).

So, if you’re going to be charging sales tax (in most cases you are), just check the main tax box. As soon as you do this, a new set of boxes will appear and inform you of what’s going to happen next.

woocommerce tax toggle

Note. Even though WooCommerce will pre-fill the tax settings for you, you still need to double-check with your local authorities what the actual current taxation rules are, especially if you’re not in the US. To learn more about WooCommerce’s way of handling sales taxes, read this. You can change everything later on, so don’t worry if you’re not sure about the rules right now.

Click “Continue.”

Pick a Payment Method (PayPal is recommended)

Being able to accept online payments is at the core of any e-commerce store, and WooCommerce really offers a lot in terms of the available solutions.

Here’s what you get to choose from during setup:

woocommerce wizard payments

Two of the most popular payment options are at the very top – PayPal and Stripe – and it’s highly recommended that you integrate your site with both. Just click their corresponding checkboxes.

You can also select other payment methods that seem to make sense, plus there’s going to be even more options available later on in your WooCommerce settings panel.

Note. In order to make online payments work, you need to sign up with either PayPal or Stripe separately. The settings in WooCommerce are only for integrating your existing PayPal and Stripe accounts with your new e-commerce website.

Again, click “Continue” when done.

The next step is just a confirmation screen that everything went well. At this stage, your basic site setup is done – as in, you’ve just built a blank e-commerce store with WooCommerce!

The next step is adding products to it. Here’s how:

STEP 4. Add your first product

To truly be able to call your store operational, you need some products in the database (or services, or downloads, or whatever it is that you want to sell).

To start working with products, go to your dashboard and then to Products / Add Product:

add product

What you’re going to see is a classic WordPress content editing screen. Here’s what’s going on:

woocommerce product add

  1. Product name.
  2. The main product description. This large field allows you to enter as much info about the product as you wish. And since this is WordPress, you can put not only simple text there but also images, columns, headings, even videos and other media. Basically, whatever you see fit.
  3. The central product data section. This one is where you get to set the type of product that you’re adding, and whether it’s a downloadable or virtual product (services are considered virtual products too). As part of this central section, you also get tabs for various parameters of the product:
    1. General. This is where you get to set the pricing and taxes.
    2. Inventory. WooCommerce allows you to manage stock levels.
    3. Shipping. Set the weight, dimensions, and the cost of shipping.
    4. Linked Products. Great for setting things like upsells and cross-sales. (Think, “Customers who bought this also bought that.”)
    5. Attributes. Set custom product attributes here. E.g., if you’re selling shirts, you can set alternative colors here.
    6. Advanced. Additional settings. Non-essential.
  4. Short Description. This is the text that gets displayed on the product page under the name. Works best as a short summary of what the product is.
  5. Product Categories. Set those to group similar products together. E.g., “hats.” Works just like standard WordPress categories.
  6. Product Tags. Additional way to help you organize your database of products. Works just like standard WordPress tags.
  7. Product Image. The main product image.
  8. Product Gallery. Additional product images to showcase its awesomeness.

Also, the first time you visit this panel, WooCommerce will display some handy tooltips to explain what’s the purpose of each field:

woocommerce add product tooltips

Once you’re done setting all of the above, just click the big Publish button, and your first product has just been added!

After adding a handful of goods to your database, the products section in the dashboard should look something like this:

woocommerce products

STEP 5. Choose a theme for your online store (FREE)

There’s a very good reason why I first covered how to add products to your store, before discussing the visual appearance of the entire thing.

Quite frankly, without any products in the database, you wouldn’t be able to see the individual pages of the store in any representative form, so you wouldn’t be able to make sure that everything looks right.

But now that you do have most of your products added, we can make sure that things are in order from a purely visual standpoint.

WooCommerce vs your current theme

By default, WooCommerce works with any WordPress theme. This is great news especially if you’ve already picked your design and you want to stick with it.

Alternatively, you can go with special WooCommerce-optimized themes. Those themes come with pre-set styles that make all WooCommerce elements look great.

Here’s my recommendation:

theme choice

The official WooCommerce theme – and the one that’s the most likely to work properly – is called Storefront. The default version is free, and it should be enough to get you going.

storefront

Alternatively, you can visit the e-commerce section at ThemeForest – the biggest directory of premium WordPress themes on the web.

themeforest

Regardless if you’ve decided to stick with your current theme or have gone for something new and WooCommerce-optimized, what you need to do next is make sure that the individual pages of the store look properly good. Let’s do that now:

The rules of e-commerce store design

Let’s discuss a handful of important points first, before we get into the nitty-gritty.

Mainly, what makes an e-commerce store design good (read: profitable)? Here are the most crucial parameters:

  • The design needs to be clear and not confusing in any way. A visitor who’s confused won’t buy anything.
  • The center content block needs to grab the visitor’s attention right after they come to the site. That center block is where the products will be displayed.
  • Adjustable sidebars. You need to be able to select how many sidebars you need, and also disable the sidebar altogether for some pages (more on that later).
  • Responsive and mobile-optimized. Research indicates [2] that around 80% of people on the internet own a smartphone. And according to another research [3], 61% of your mobile visitors will leave immediately and go to your competitors if they have a frustrating mobile browsing experience. In other words, making sure that your website is optimized for mobile is crucial.
  • Good navigation structure. You want clear menus that are easy to grasp – just so your visitors can find the page they’re looking for.

Having the above in mind, here’s what you can do with the individual pages of the store:

Your shop page

This is where the main listing of your products can be found. If you’ve gone through the WooCommerce setup wizard then this page can be found at YOURDOMAIN.com/shop

This is a standard WordPress page – you can edit it via WordPress dashboard / Pages.

The things that are worth doing:

  • Add some copy that will encourage your visitors to shop with you.
  • Decide if you want to have the sidebar on the page. This is done through your theme’s own page templates. For instance, Storefront allows me to go full-width, which I will do:

full-width

The main trait of the Shop page is that right below the standard content, it features a custom part where it displays your product listings. This is what it looks like on the Storefront theme:

woocommerce shop page

As you can see, nice product images are key, and this is the first thing that you should get right. In other words, you should probably work on your product images more than on anything else.

WooCommerce also enables you to display your products in alternative ways on this page. When you go to WordPress dashboard / WooCommerce / Settings / Products and then the Display section:

woocommerce products display

… you can choose whether you want to display individual products or product categories on the Shop page. Select whatever makes the most sense for you, and save settings.

Individual product pages

In order to see those, just click on any product listing from the Shop page.

If you’re using a quality theme, you shouldn’t experience any difficulties on this particular page. Basically, the only thing you can do is adjust the amount of text that you’re using for individual product descriptions, just to make sure that everything fits visually and that there are no blank spots that could confuse the buyer.

Here’s my example with the Storefront theme (no additional customizations done):

woocommerce products listing

Shoping cart

Another crucial page that can be adjusted through Dashboard / Pages.

The one thing I would recommend here is to go for the full-width layout. You don’t want to give the buyer too many options on this page, apart from proceeding to checkout.

woocommerce cart

Checkout

Checkout is perhaps the most important page of them all. It’s where your buyers get to finalize their orders and make the payments.

I don’t actually encourage you to do any tweaks to that page apart from one:

The Checkout page absolutely needs to be full-width. The only acceptable way out of the page for the buyer should be to finalize their order, and not get distracted by the things available in the sidebar.

Again, you can do this via Dashboard / Pages (just repeat the process you went through with the Shop page).

Apart from that, the default look of the Checkout page is great:

woocommerce checkout

At this stage, you are basically done with adjusting your store design, now let’s look into the possibilities to extend the store’s functionality.

STEP 6. Extending WooCommerce – how to

One more thing that makes WooCommerce such an impressive e-commerce solution is that there are tens or even hundreds of extensions and plugins available for it.

Let’s list some of the most useful ones here:

WooCommerce extensions

Let’s start with the extensions – the official add-ons that have been approved by the WooCommerce team.

To see what’s available, you can go to this page.

That catalog is truly impressive and vast. But I don’t want you to feel intimidated by it. You certainly don’t need all of those extensions. Just treat that list as a buffet of sorts – pick whatever seems cool.

Some of the more worthy mentions:

  • Payment gateways. These extensions allow you to accept more payment methods on top of just the standard PayPal. In general, the more methods of payment you can afford to accept (those gateways are often paid), the better.
  • Shipping extensions. These are going to be handy if you want to automatically integrate your store with the official shipping rates from companies such as UPS or FedEx.
  • Accounting extensions. Integrate your WooCommerce store with the accounting tool of your choice.
  • WooCommerce Bookings. Allow customers to book appointments for services without leaving your site.
  • WooCommerce Subscriptions. Let customers subscribe to your products or services and pay a weekly, monthly or annual fee.
  • EU VAT Number. For those operating within the EU.
  • TaxJar. Put your sales tax on autopilot.

Alternatively, if you don’t want to spend any money on new extensions, you can browse around in the free category. There’s more than enough stuff there to keep you occupied.

Plugins that supercharge your e-commerce store

Setting the extensions aside, you can also use other WordPress plugins to further supercharge your store. Here’s what you should get:

Creating an Online Store in Nutshell

As you can see, the degree of difficulty when it comes to creating your own e-commerce store with WordPress isn’t too high, but it will still take you a while to get through all of the steps above … probably one afternoon or so.

But that’s still incredible considering that just, say, five years ago you would need to hire a developer and pay them north of $5,000 to get something similar created. Now, you can do everything on your own.

Anyway, to help you get through all the tasks required, here’s a cut-out-‘n-keep checklist:

Before you begin

Installing WooCommerce

  • Install and activate the main WooCommerce plugin.
  • Go through the WooCommerce setup wizard, paying close attention to:
    • Getting the four required pages created (Shop, Cart, Checkout, My Account).
    • Setting up the store locale.
    • Setting up sales tax and shipping.
    • Picking initial payment methods.

Products

  • Add most (or all) of your products or product categories to the store.

Design

  • Select the right WordPress theme for your e-commerce store. Go either with your existing theme, or browse through the other possibilities. Review the rules of e-commerce store design when doing so.
  • Adjust your Shop page.
  • Adjust individual product pages.
  • Adjust the Cart page.
  • Adjust the Checkout page.

Extensions

  • Install the payment gateways that you want to use.
  • Consider some of the shipping extensions.
  • Consider an accounting extension.
  • Browse through other extensions, and also the free category.

Plugins

  • Consider installing all of the plugins that will supercharge your e-commerce store:
    • Yoast SEO
    • Yoast WooCommerce SEO
    • WooCommerce Multilingual
    • Contact Form 7
    • UpdraftPlus
    • Social Share Buttons by GetSocial
    • MonsterInsights
    • iThemes Security
    • W3 Total Cache.

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            • Hi there, we used to be with WordPress and have change over a year to Shopify by recommendation. We are not happy and have considered to go back to WordPress almost equally the time.

              Obviously we need to migrate – how do we export our content and how much time should we calculate for the process?

              Thanks so much in advance!

              Patricia

          1. Great writeup, very clear and informative.

            I am currently hosting a WP blog on a virtual private server which has no SSL support (I believe this is so because I do not have a dedicated IP address).

            Would this work for me or should I seek/change to a provider with an SSL cert support ?

            Thank you.

          2. Hi Robert – I have I registered my domain with GODaddy. They also have a service of setting up an online store and they are charging US$ 15/month for this service in India. Please advice if you would recommend this compared to WooCommerce.

            • Hi Vijay,

              I haven’t used their service thus I can’t comment on this one. $15/mo quickly adds up to $150+/year. I’d advise setting up the store by yourself. It’s really simple – just follow the tutorial.

          3. Robert, this is very helpful. One question, I have an existing WordPress site. I want to add a store. I have installed Woo Commerce, but not yet Storefront (which I think I will use because it is free and I don’t have lots of complicated things to sell). I notice that with Woo Commerce alone I am not happy with the look, which is why I want to add Storefront.

            I’m a little confused about how to add Storefront. Am I installing it on the shop page? My apologies if I am asking you something you have already answered. Not very technologically literate!

          4. I deal in large items and I do ship them but it is a unique process due to it being steel posts and fencing, shipping is usually a hunt and find best rates through various carriers depending on areas some have really good rates where others do not. Just wondering if this a good idea for me to use a commerce page and if you have viable options you know of or have run across.

          5. I have never setup an e-commerce site before. One of the question I am wondering about is who is responsible for the PCI compliant part?

          6. Hey, Robert thanks for good information. I have one question: What do you think about Woocommerce free themes security – is it less secure than premium themes?
            Thanks!

            • Hey Jakob,

              Security shouldn’t be an issue if the theme is being updated. I’d advise checking the last update date (if it’s less than 6 months – then I’d give it a go). But in general – paid themes tend to be more secure, though. Hope this helps.

          7. Hi Robert,
            I have a theme installed from Template Monster that I really like and it has a few page format options which I have used for other pages that work well. I wanted to use the same layouts for for Woocommerece but when I setup Woocommerce it only lets me use the Default Page setup and it is not the look I want.
            Can I override the Default Page setup and load up another page layout.
            I have tried using the Full Width etc from the dropdown menu on the pages but it just changes back to the Default Page when you update it. Apart from changing the main style css is there any other option that would ork.

            Thanks
            Ross

          8. Hi!

            Great info, thanks. Do you know if WooCommerce allows you to create an online store WITHOUT a shopping cart option required? I sell custom hats, created-to-order, and do not need a shopping cart. Also do not need a payment method because I correspond with my customers and once a custom design is finalized they send payments via check or bank wire transfer.

            Any information would be greatly appreciated, thanks!
            Sally

          9. Hello Robert,

            Thank you for the much needed tutorial! You recommended acquiring a domain name through bluehost but they are charging $3.95 per month introductory rate and the regular rate of 7.99 a month after. If I begin at wordpress, they offer a personal subscription for $2.99 per month — this appears to be the regular rate. Is it ok to build the domain name and website directly through wordpress and skip the bluehost part? or am I missing something? I am not at all technically savvy (the reason I am on this tutorial 🙂 and am hoping that I wouldn’t be making a mistake to set this up directly through wordpress?? Advice appreciated …

            • Hi Kim

              In order to set up an online store with WordPress, you’ll still need a web hosting and a domain name (YourStoreAddress.com). Otherwise you won’t be able to set up an online store for others to read and browse. Hope this helps.

          10. If I’m understanding right in this tutorial, customers will have to click or hover over shop to see the categories instead of listing them on the homepage. Is this correct or am I misunderstanding. I would rather have the categories listed on the homepage instead of under “shop”.

            This tutorial is great! I can’t wait to put it to use soon. I started to create my own website but decided it was too overwhelming. I thought about Shopify but can’t get past how much it is per month. I’m hoping I can understand this tutorial so I can save money!

            Thanks in advance for your help!!

            • Hi Erica,

              You can display your products in different ways. As in categories or on the front page. WooCommerce + WordPress is pretty flexible 🙂

          11. I really love reading ur blog. I was planning to have an online selling website, luckily I bumped into ur page. Tnx a lot. But I hope this will work for me, since I’m in the Philippines, I’m not sure this will work in our area.

            Tnk u.
            Arnel

          12. Thanks for the tutorial. Some of my questions:
            1. Can I have multiple domains that are unrelated in the Web Host?
            2. Can I upgrade plans later on if I initially choose the Basic
            3. Can I change the type of website later on? Example, I initially created a blog site, then Later on I wanted an e commerce site.

            Thanks a lot!

            • 1. Yes
              2. Yes
              3. Yes, but you’d need to reinstall WordPress then (do you plan to keep the content when you’re making the switch?)

          13. HI Robert,
            Thank you so much for this information. I had set mine up two years ago but just decided to do a major clean up of my site and had forgotten a lot of stuff 🙂 so this was an tutorial!
            Your post was a perfect refresher! Just one question:

            I bought an SSL certificate through Host Gator and upgraded several issues that the WooCommerce plugin status report showed as necessary for e-commerce. I had to use a force SSL plugin based on a few minor issues such as a couple of jpgs. I fixed them all but still have one darned remaining message left:
            Security
            Secure connection (HTTPS): Your store is not using HTTPS. Learn more about HTTPS and SSL Certificates.
            Hide errors from visitor

            My address reads as a HTPPS site and does indeed show up as having an active SSL. I don’t know what to do about this and the reason that I went on this giant cleanup was to fix my downloadable files. They are never sent correctly from Google Drive to the customer. (I sell some instructional videos and the files are too big to put on my site. )

            Any suggestions? Sorry for this long message but I hope it makes sense and might have seen this before ?

            Best
            Sarah

          14. Great Article!! Very Informative and to the point!! I accomplished most of these tasks!!
            I would like to ask a question.

            What about the clients that have already say have a product catalog which is contained in a csv file. Is it possible to simply load the csv file and automiatically place itself in the right sections in the product table?
            As woocommerce recently updated their CSV suite and I have never tried since its a payment of $50.

            I was wondering whether you tried this plugin before and if its worth going into it as I also noticed other similar sites selling 3rd party software for woocommerce too and for different prices.

          15. Robert, this was the smoothest tutorial so far.
            I have one question at the moment,
            How do we add the Thank You page?
            We surely want our customers to be redirected to thank you page after they have paid.

            So, how can it be done?

            Thanks and Regards

          16. Thank you so much for the time you put into this tutorial! Truly a blessing as I struggle through my first website construction. Best wishes!

          17. Hi Robert,

            You have created a highly informational tutorial and quite easy to understand for non-technical people like me.

            I am working on an online educational services portal (something like online Maths tutorial), where some contents are free and some are restricted to paid members only. This is targeted for Australia based highschool students. My commercial model is subscription based payment model, or one-time payments for a length of time. In one-way it’s an ecommerce where the users will purchase through one of the means and will have login-credentials to access the paid contents. But as you can guess, it is not a retail outlet kind of ecommerce portal, which we usually come across.
            Would you suggest WordPress + woocommerce for this kind of setup? Or some other plugins?

            Additionally, do you know, if the Australia based payment gateways can be integrated with WooCommerce?

            • Hi Alex,

              I think WordPress + WooCommerce is probably the best option for this. You might have to also look for “membership plugins” which should do what you need. WP also has a large amount of freelance developers who can help you with the full integration. WooCommerce definitely works with PayPal 🙂

          18. How can I start and launch my own e-commerce store and make money by selling the products.
            How can I get paid through the internet ?

          19. Thanks for such an impressive tutorial. But I’ve some questions.
            Is it possible to use woocommerce to sell house plans online? if it’s possible, what’s the best theme to recommend for this purpose?

          20. What I’m actually seeing here is steps on getting an eCommerce which is in the form of a desktop site. I want to know how to make it a mobile site as well, due to the fact that these days a lot use their smartphones even more than their personal computers or laptops. Or when you create the desktop site does it automatically create a mobile site too?

          21. Thank you so much for the information and tutorial. it is truly helpful for a newbie in website setup like me. I plan to sell both physical goods and digital image on my website, is it alright to be selling different types of goods using this plugin? And for the digital image, how do I provide selection of sizes of the digital image to be downloaded by the customer?
            Thanks again in advance!
            Rin

          22. Hello,

            I have a stationery business selling business cards, letterhead etc. When a person orders, they have to choose stock, quantity, font, flat v raised etc. Very detailed. Is WooCommerce good for that?

          23. Hi Robert,
            Thank you for that great tutorial, let me ask you some questions about the best plugins for generate invoices automatically and link Woocommerce to an accounting software (I am in France)
            Regards

          24. Hi Robert. I like what I just read. I am stoked about starting an online store and the main reason why I came to find your blog post is because I want to rely mostly on SEO however, what bothers me is on how to consistently create a blog post that will rank and gain traffic over time. ALSO, how can we duplicate post? Thanks and I’m looking forward to hear from you soon!

          25. Hi Robert,
            We have a website, but we are not happy with our website developer and host. What is the procedures to move domain to different hosting company?

            With regards,
            Linas

          26. Hi Robert,

            Great information indeed. I am very new to this field and am trying to set up a site to sell books online. I am following the information regarding the use of WordPress and WooCommerce you have provided above. In this content, I have a very basic query: I believe along with the product listing pages, I would also be able to provide some introductory pages and tabs where I can define the goal of the website as well as provide links some documents which the users can download. Please let me know if this is the case.

            Kind regards,
            Vikas.

          27. Robert, thanks for this excellent tutorial! One question, though:
            Is WooComerce a fully automated system regarding the sale of digital goods?
            Downloads unlock automaticly when paypal/”the other ones” are used ?
            After the one purchased DL – is it locked/secured again, meaning:
            the seller does not get involved in the automated sales process ?
            Or am I asking too much of a free shop system?
            In this case would you be so kind to recommend one that will “do the sales work” – be the “sales clerk” ?
            T.

          28. Hi Robert, thanks for the very informative article.

            My question is: is it possible with WooCommerce to enable multiple merchants to register on your website and display multiple listings – each merchant having their own dashboard where they can monitor sales and add/amend/remove products?

            Thanks!
            Gabriele

          29. Thank you, this has been amazing. Can I use paystack because PayPal does not work in Nigeria? And can I have both pay on delivery and prepaid in my checkout?